Category Archives: ACRL

Two articles in the July issue of College & Research Libraries

Here are two relevant articles that were recently published in College & Research Libraries.

Degrees of Impact: Analyzing the Effects of Progressive Librarian Course Collaborations on Student Performance” by Char Booth, M. Sara Lowe, Natalie Tagge, and Sean M. Stone.

Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs” by Jeffery L. Loo and Elizabeth A. Dupuis.

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Collaboration at ACRL 2015

The 2015 Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference took place in Portland, OR from March 24-28, 2015. There were several panels, papers, and posters relating to collaboration in libraries.

A highlight of the collaboration related sessions with online materials:

Achieving Big City Dreams at Small Town Libraries: How Seven Regional College Libraries Used Collaboration and Adobe Captivate to Create an Online Information Literacy Tutorial Program
Speakers: Adrianna Lancaster, Sharon Morrison, Allison Embry, Chelsea Baker
Session Format: Panel Session, Assessment

Build Sustainable Collaboration: Developing and Assessing Metaliteracy Across Information Ecosystems
Speakers: Alex Hodges, Alison Thomas
Session Format: Contributed Paper, Teaching & Learning

Collective Strengths: Institutional Repositories & Communities of Practice
Speakers: Sarah Beaubien, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Sarah Shreeves, Claire Stewart
Session Format: Panel Session, Scholarly Communication

Digital Humanities in Ten Pages or Less! Engaging Students with Digital Texts through Sustainable Collaboration
Speakers: Judith Arnold, Graham Hukill, Julie Thompson Klein
Session Format: Panel Session, Teaching & Learning

Keep it Green: Leading Sustainable and Successful Online Teams
Speakers: Carrie Moran, Heidi Steiner Burkhardt, Beth Filar-Williams, John Jackson
Session Format: Panel Session, Leadership & Management

Leveraging Library Ecology: Growing Beyond Boundaries to Cultivate a Sustainable Knowledge Community Through Team-Based Librarianship
Speakers: Ellen Urton, Meagan Duever, Casey Hoeve, Jenny Oleen, Livia Olsen, David Vail
Session Format: Contributed Paper, Sustainability

Leveraging OA, the IR, and Cross-department Collaboration for Sustainability: Ensuring Library Centrality in the Scholarly Communication Discourse on Campus
Speakers: Todd Bruns, Steve Brantley
Session Format: Contributed Paper, Scholarly Communication

Partners in Design: Consortial Collaboration for Digital Learning Object Creation
Speakers: Glynis Asu, Barbara Norelli, Peter Rogers, Beth Ruane
Session Format: Panel Session, Teaching & Learning

Teeming with Technology, Teaming with Technologists: Using Digital Tools to Enhance Primary Source Literacy
Speakers: Ben Murphy, Melissa Salrin, Kaitlin Justin
Session Format: Panel Session, Technology

You Can Succeed Here! Making Connections through Library Outreach from Grades 3 to 13
Speakers: Jamie Hazlitt, Christina Sheldon, Lettycia Terrones
Session Format: Panel Session, Teaching & Learning

The full schedule can be found here.

 

From the January 2015 issue of C&RL News

This is a good article from the January 2015 issue of the C&RL News.

One-to-one instruction: Two perspectives – by Ellen Bahr and Chandler Harriss.

In this article, we share a description and analysis of a project undertaken as part of an introductory-level mass communication class at Alfred University (AU). The project involved a semester-long collaboration between a librarian and a faculty member. The project was founded by a desire to give students an integrative experience, meaning an experience that connects the classroom with external campus resources (i.e., the library). We will present the experience from two perspectives, that of the librarian and that of the faculty.

Breaking rules sometimes needs collaboration

This is an interesting presentation – Breaking all the Rules: Lock-in at the Sciences Library, by Brett Cloyd and Sara Scheib

Abstract

Imagine forty first-year students at the library after hours, yelling and racing through the stacks, pulling books off the shelf before sprinting to another section. It might sound like a librarian’s worst nightmare, but it was all according to plan. In an effort to help overcome library anxiety and give our students a fun introduction to academic libraries, we broke all the rules to develop a Library Lock-In event. This collaborative effort supported by the Library, Residence Life, and the Honors Program turned out to be very successful and was one of the most well-attended programs offered to the LLCs. In this session, you will learn more about LLC program, how we worked with Residence Life and the Honors Program to plan and publicize the event, what activities worked well, what didn’t and what we’ve learned from our mistakes.

Bunch of articles in the new C&RL News

There a several new articles that are about collaboration in the new College & Research Libraries News, such as these:

Get ready for a long night: Collaborating with the writing center to combat student procrastination, by Ilka Datig and Luise Herkner.

And

Tooling up: Scholarly communication education and training, by Maria Bonn

Scholarly communication programming and services can also be built through campus collaborations. Libraries can find aligned partners in campus publishing efforts, such as university presses, in the general counsel’s office and/or law schools, in media studies departments, in offices of research and, of course, in the scholars who populate their campuses and who are often keenly interested in the conditions under which they communicate and propagate their research findings.

Collaborations can also be built within the libraries themselves, by bringing together staff with expertise in a variety of areas into working groups or planning committees to define areas of need and to suggest and develop programming to meet such need.

And others.

Academic librarians should participate in departmental faculty candidate interviews

This is a great article in the new C&RL News.

The first sparks of collaboration: Participating in job interviews for faculty candidates” by Brett Spencer.

As shown by many inspiring articles in C&RL News over the past few years, academic librarians are energetically seeking ways to spark collaborations with teaching faculty and build partnerships that enrich the learning experiences of our students. Librarians often have their first opportunity to meet a new faculty member when the prospective professor comes to campus for an interview. Perhaps you’re a liaison to an academic department, and the department brings faculty candidates over to the library so that you can give them a quick tour and highlight the array of information resources they could access if they accepted positions on your campus. I think these library visits are great opportunities to kindle relationships with new faculty. This article offers some questions to consider when preparing for faculty interviews, based on tips and advice that I’ve received from outstanding teaching faculty and seasoned library colleagues over the years.

Collaborative publications, bibliometrics, and veterinary medical research

This early view article came out about six months ago in preparation for College & Research Libraries. I am not sure how I missed it.

Exploring the Veterinary Literature: A Bibliometric Methodology for Identifying Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Publications,” by Jessica R. Page, Heather K. Moberly, Gregory K. Youngen, and Barbara J. Hamel

Veterinary medical research traditionally focuses on animal health and wellness; however, research activities at veterinary colleges extend beyond these traditional areas. In this study, we analyzed eleven years of Web of Knowledge-indexed peer-reviewed articles from researchers at the twenty-eight United States American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary colleges.

We had three goals in assessing the published literature of veterinary college researchers. First, we identified a list of journals and research areas outside of veterinary medicine in which veterinary researchers publish. This list of journals can be customized to identify those most essential at each institution. Second, we identified collaborative work by veterinary researchers across disciplines and institutions. Using textual analysis tools and visualizations helped us illustrate and clarify this data. Lastly, we developed a methodology for defining an interdisciplinary serials list outside a subject core that can be customized for specific institutions and subject areas.

I found a cite to this through Gregory K. Youngen’s presentation at a recent Association of Interdisciplinary Studies conference.