Category Archives: Joe

New website, new volume, new issue

The journal is transitioning to a new look and feel.  The new journal home is at:

http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/

The new table of contents for Volume 8, Issue 1 (2016) is:

The new issue is ready – Volume 7, Issue 3

Vol 7, No. 3 (2015): Volume 7, Issue 3

Table of Contents

Editorials

The Seven Year Ache PDF

Ivan Gaetz

98

Scholarly Articles

Cohort-Based Technology Training: A Collaboration with Faculty Grounded in Diffusion of Innovation and Faculty Learning Community Theories Abstract PDF

Gretel Stock-Kupperman

99-108
Cross Collaboration: Librarians Stepping out of the Box to Serve Students Abstract PDF

Denelle Eads, Rebecca Freeman, Valerie Freeman

109-119
Does Virtual Communication Equal Virtual Collaboration? The Influence of Technology on Job Satisfaction and Collaboration Abstract PDF

Kathy Butler, Michael Perini

120-129

From the Field

Collaborative Cataloging Pilot Project Abstract PDF

Jamey Harris, Marilou Hinchcliff

130-138
Finding Joy in Our Profession: John F. Helmer on Library Consortia Abstract PDF

John F. Helmer, Valerie Horton

139-144

Viewpoints: Technology Matters

Liberated from the Circulation Desk – Now What? PDF

Lori Bowen Ayre

145-147

Two articles in the July issue of College & Research Libraries

Here are two relevant articles that were recently published in College & Research Libraries.

Degrees of Impact: Analyzing the Effects of Progressive Librarian Course Collaborations on Student Performance” by Char Booth, M. Sara Lowe, Natalie Tagge, and Sean M. Stone.

Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs” by Jeffery L. Loo and Elizabeth A. Dupuis.

From the January 2015 issue of C&RL News

This is a good article from the January 2015 issue of the C&RL News.

One-to-one instruction: Two perspectives – by Ellen Bahr and Chandler Harriss.

In this article, we share a description and analysis of a project undertaken as part of an introductory-level mass communication class at Alfred University (AU). The project involved a semester-long collaboration between a librarian and a faculty member. The project was founded by a desire to give students an integrative experience, meaning an experience that connects the classroom with external campus resources (i.e., the library). We will present the experience from two perspectives, that of the librarian and that of the faculty.

Two Iowa institutions will collaborate on humanities research

This is a nice article in Inside Higher Ed concerning a collaboration between a college and a University in Iowa.

Grinnell College and the University of Iowa are using the digital humanities to bridge the physical distance and institutional differences between their campuses.

Over the next four years, the two institutions will encourage students, faculty and staffers to form “new kinds of teams” to collaborate on humanities research and use digital resources in the classroom. Supported by a $1.6 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the initiative, titled Digital Bridges for Humanistic Inquiry, is being billed by university officials as the first time the foundation has supported a direct partnership between a public research university and a private liberal arts college.

OpenCon–leading the charge for openness and collaboration

OpenCon 2014 took place November 15th to the 17th. The text below was in an email from ARL/SPARC as a Special Member Communication.

The goal of OpenCon was to convene those in the next generation leading the charge for openness in research and education, energize them by bringing them together with peers and leaders in the community, and support them in their advocacy efforts after the meeting – particularly in projects done in collaboration with their libraries.

Article about university press and library collaboration in JLSC

Roh, C. (2014). Library-Press Collaborations: A Study Taken on Behalf of the University of Arizona. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(4):eP1102. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1102

BACKGROUND The University of Arizona Press moved under the University of Arizona Library both physically and administratively a few years ago, echoing a trend amongst university presses: 20 AAUP members now are under the administration of university libraries. To understand the new evolving relationships in scholarly communication, a review of university press and library collaborations was undertaken by the University of Arizona Press and the University of Arizona Library through the Association of Research Libraries Career Enhancement Program (ARL CEP).

Some open access news from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation notes that they:

believe that published research resulting from our funding should be promptly and broadly disseminated. We have adopted an Open Access policy that enables the unrestricted access and reuse of all peer-reviewed published research funded, in whole or in part, by the foundation, including any underlying data sets.

Scientific collaboration and team size since 1900–How much does that matter?

I got an alert from Wiley that this article, “Team size matters: Collaboration and scientific impact since 1900,” was published in JASIST.  I then found that the authors posted a previous version at the arXiv.

Team size matters: Collaboration and scientific impact since 1900 by Vincent Lariviere, Cassidy Sugimoto, Andrew Tsou, Yves Gingras

This paper provides the first historical analysis of the relationship between collaboration and scientific impact, using three indicators of collaboration (number of authors, number of addresses, and number of countries) and including articles published between 1900 and 2011. The results demonstrate that an increase in the number of authors leads to an increase in impact–from the beginning of the last century onwards–and that this is not simply due to self-citations. A similar trend is also observed for the number of addresses and number of countries represented in the byline of an article. However, the constant inflation of collaboration since 1900 has resulted in diminishing citation returns: larger and more diverse (in terms of institutional and country affiliation) teams are necessary to realize higher impact. The paper concludes with a discussion of the potential causes of the impact gain in citations of collaborative papers.

It takes collaboration to support university research and visualization

CURVE: Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment by Bryan Sinclair, Georgia State University

Abstract

CURVE: Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment is a new technology-rich discovery space supporting the research and digital scholarship of Georgia State University students, faculty, and staff. Located at the heart of the Georgia State campus within the University Library, CURVE’s mission is to enhance research and visualizations by providing technology and services that promote interdisciplinary engagement, collaborative investigation, and innovative inquiry. The centerpiece technology, the interactWall, is a touch enabled, 24-foot-wide video wall designed for collaborative visual and data-rich research projects. Seven additional collaborative workstations, including an advanced 4K workstation, feature high-powered PCs and Mac Pros that allow users to work with and manipulate large images and datasets. Each workstation is equipped with a large display that can accommodate up to six people, allowing multiple groups to work together on a research problem.