Category Archives: Digitization

FDR archive available on the web

A publicly available database of documents and photographs relating to Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt is now available. The database is a collaborative effort by the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, the National Archives and Records Administration, Marist College, IBM and the Roosevelt Institute.

http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/collections/franklin/

 

 

National Archives and UVA release Founders Online website

“This free online tool brings together the papers of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison in a single website that gives a first-hand account of the growth of democracy and the birth of the Republic.

Founders Online was created through a cooperative agreement between the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), the grant-making arm of the National Archives, and The University of Virginia (UVA) Press.”

http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2013/nr13-103.html

The Darwin project collaborated with the Cambridge Digital Library

The Darwin Project collaborated with the Cambridge Digital Library to publish images of about 1,200 letters exchanged between Charles Darwin and Joseph Dalton Hooker. There are more than 5,000 images in the collection.

No single set of letters was more important to Darwin than those exchanged with the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911). Their letters account for around 10% of Darwin’s surviving correspondence and provide a structure within which all the other letters can be explored.  They are a connecting thread that spans forty years of Darwin’s mature working life from 1843 until his death in 1882, and bring into sharp focus every aspect of Darwin’s scientific work throughout that period. They illuminate the mutual friendships he and Hooker shared with other scientists, but they also provide a window of unparalleled intimacy into the personal lives of the two men.

What is DPLA?

Find out at: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/04/future-of-libraries/whats-is-the-dpla/

Link

Major Maine Libraries, Public and Academic, Collaborate on Print Archiving Project

Major Maine Libraries, Public and Academic, Collaborate on Print Archiving Project

LJ excerpt: “Eight of Maine’s largest libraries, both public and academic, are about halfway through a major and distinctive project for the shared management and archiving of their print collections and the integration of digital editions into a statewide catalog”

NATIONAL ARCHIVES TO HELP LAUNCH THE DIGITAL PUBLIC LIBRARY OF AMERICA’S PILOT PROJECT

Excerpt“Washington, DC. . . Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero announced today that the National Archives, as a leading content provider to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), will help launch its first pilot project.

The DPLA is a large-scale, collaborative project across government, research institutions, museums, libraries and archives to build a digital library platform to make America’s cultural and scientific history free and publicly available anytime, anywhere, online through a single access point.”

Evolution of libraries had emerged-collaboration was a key to survival

Excerpt “By the beginning of the 21st century, several trends in the evolution of libraries had emerged-collaboration was a key to survival; technology would play an integral role; library as “place” would supersede a warehouse function; and digitization would prevail.

In this article I want to explore two experiments that represent the perfect interweaving of these trends-HathiTrust (hathitrust.org) and the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA; dp.la). These experiments in shared systems, metadata, and digitized content represent projects of a grand and grander scale. While there is no guarantee that either of these projects will be around, at least in current manifestation, it is almost certain that within 15 years their models will provide guidance for any large-scale library ventures of the future.”

HathiTrust collaboration continues strong after five years

2012 brought to a close the initial 5-year charter period that HathiTrust was granted by its founding institutions. 5 years later, the collaborative is stronger than ever. More than 70 academic and research institutions from around the world participate in HathiTrust, supporting a digital repository of 10.6 million volumes and a host of shared activities, all geared toward the provision of greater access to the scholarly and cultural record, more secure preservation, and greater research opportunities for our constituencies than we have ever had before. As we launch into a new year, and a new stage of HathiTrust, it is worthwhile to reflect on our progress and achievements in 2012. These include:

• A significant legal victory and affirmation of Fair Use in the case of Authors Guild v. HathiTrust
• Many new partners and a new governance structure
• A steady stream of technological improvements and enhancements
• Development of new services and infrastructure
• Continued engagement with our community in the form of presentations, discussions, and the HathiTrust Research Center Uncamp

A recap of activities in these areas and more can be read in the review, attached, and also available on our website:
http://www.hathitrust.org/updates_review2012

Please share this information widely.”

Best wishes,
Heather Christenson
on behalf of the HathiTrust Communications Working Group

 

UNC / BioMed Central partnership

Faculty and student research at University of North Carolina will now be archived through BioMed Central, adding security and discoverability to UNC science-based research results.

http://www.infodocket.com/2013/01/10/university-of-north-carolina-library-and-biomed-central-parner-to-archive-faculty-research/

Another report and a new book

I have a Google Scholar alert set up to help me find new items concerning collaboration in libraries.  This morning, these two things popped up.

Report from the Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale – What might the future be for international collaboration in digital scholarship and preservation?

Over the last decade and a half there has been impressive progress in building digital collections and preserving important cultural heritage information both in digitizing and more recently in capturing born digital content. Yet the pace of publishing has outstripped the traditional library model and capacity for keeping up with collecting and preserving important content. Simply stated the traditional model cannot scale to keep pace with the vast amount of information being created. What can be done about it? Is there an international approach? What will the future hold for digital scholarship and preservation depends on actions that can be formulated and executed today to address the future.

Book – William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media A bit of the book is also in Google Books.

William Blake’s work demonstrates two tendencies that are central to social media: collaboration and participation. Not only does Blake cite and adapt the work of earlier authors and visual artists, but contemporary authors, musicians, and filmmakers feel compelled to use Blake in their own creative acts. This book identifies and examines Blake’s work as a social and participatory network, a phenomenon described as zoamorphosis, which encourages — even demands — that others take up Blake’s creative mission. The authors rexamine the history of the digital humanities in relation to the study and dissemination of Blake’s work: from alternatives to traditional forms of archiving embodied by Blake’s citation on Twitter and Blakean remixes on YouTube, smartmobs using Blake’s name as an inspiration to protest the 2004 Republican National Convention, and students crowdsourcing reading and instruction in digital classrooms to better understand and participate in Blake’s world. The book also includes a consideration of Blakean motifs that have created artistic networks in music, literature, and film in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries, showing how Blake is an ideal exemplar for understanding creativity in the digital age.