Another report and a new book

I have a Google Scholar alert set up to help me find new items concerning collaboration in libraries.  This morning, these two things popped up.

Report from the Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale – What might the future be for international collaboration in digital scholarship and preservation?

Over the last decade and a half there has been impressive progress in building digital collections and preserving important cultural heritage information both in digitizing and more recently in capturing born digital content. Yet the pace of publishing has outstripped the traditional library model and capacity for keeping up with collecting and preserving important content. Simply stated the traditional model cannot scale to keep pace with the vast amount of information being created. What can be done about it? Is there an international approach? What will the future hold for digital scholarship and preservation depends on actions that can be formulated and executed today to address the future.

Book – William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media A bit of the book is also in Google Books.

William Blake’s work demonstrates two tendencies that are central to social media: collaboration and participation. Not only does Blake cite and adapt the work of earlier authors and visual artists, but contemporary authors, musicians, and filmmakers feel compelled to use Blake in their own creative acts. This book identifies and examines Blake’s work as a social and participatory network, a phenomenon described as zoamorphosis, which encourages — even demands — that others take up Blake’s creative mission. The authors rexamine the history of the digital humanities in relation to the study and dissemination of Blake’s work: from alternatives to traditional forms of archiving embodied by Blake’s citation on Twitter and Blakean remixes on YouTube, smartmobs using Blake’s name as an inspiration to protest the 2004 Republican National Convention, and students crowdsourcing reading and instruction in digital classrooms to better understand and participate in Blake’s world. The book also includes a consideration of Blakean motifs that have created artistic networks in music, literature, and film in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries, showing how Blake is an ideal exemplar for understanding creativity in the digital age.

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