Tag Archives: report

Archivisits collaborate on new CLIR report dealing with born-digital materials

Filed by Gary Price on InfoDocket

Ten archivists and curators from the US and the UK collaborated to create “Born Digital: Guidance for Donors, Dealers and Archive Repositories.” The report offers separate recommendations for repository staff and donors/dealers in differnt topics: initial collection review, privacy and intellectual property, key stages in acquiring digital materials and post-acquisition review by a repository.

From the abstract:

This report offers recommendations to help ensure the physical and intellectual well-being of born-digital materials transferred from donors to archival repositories. The report surveys the primary issues and concerns related to born-digital acquisitions and is intended for a broad audience with varying levels of interest and expertise, including donors, dealers, and repository staff.

Cornell and Columbia Libraries combine technical services

Cornell and Columbia Libraries to Build a Joint Technical Infrastructure

Mellon Grant Enables 2CUL Partnership to Combine Technical Services Departments

“Thanks to a three-year, $350,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the two libraries will integrate their technical services departments. These departments purchase and license library materials, such as books, e-books, e-journals, databases and more, and they provide data so that users can find and use those materials.”

Thanks to Gary of InfoDocket for the news.

Another report and a new book

I have a Google Scholar alert set up to help me find new items concerning collaboration in libraries.  This morning, these two things popped up.

Report from the Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale – What might the future be for international collaboration in digital scholarship and preservation?

Over the last decade and a half there has been impressive progress in building digital collections and preserving important cultural heritage information both in digitizing and more recently in capturing born digital content. Yet the pace of publishing has outstripped the traditional library model and capacity for keeping up with collecting and preserving important content. Simply stated the traditional model cannot scale to keep pace with the vast amount of information being created. What can be done about it? Is there an international approach? What will the future hold for digital scholarship and preservation depends on actions that can be formulated and executed today to address the future.

Book – William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media A bit of the book is also in Google Books.

William Blake’s work demonstrates two tendencies that are central to social media: collaboration and participation. Not only does Blake cite and adapt the work of earlier authors and visual artists, but contemporary authors, musicians, and filmmakers feel compelled to use Blake in their own creative acts. This book identifies and examines Blake’s work as a social and participatory network, a phenomenon described as zoamorphosis, which encourages — even demands — that others take up Blake’s creative mission. The authors rexamine the history of the digital humanities in relation to the study and dissemination of Blake’s work: from alternatives to traditional forms of archiving embodied by Blake’s citation on Twitter and Blakean remixes on YouTube, smartmobs using Blake’s name as an inspiration to protest the 2004 Republican National Convention, and students crowdsourcing reading and instruction in digital classrooms to better understand and participate in Blake’s world. The book also includes a consideration of Blakean motifs that have created artistic networks in music, literature, and film in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries, showing how Blake is an ideal exemplar for understanding creativity in the digital age.

“Library Publishing Services” research report from ARL SPARC

This is from the Introduction of Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success by Raym Crow, October Ivins, Allyson Mower, Daureen Nesdill, Mark Newton, Julie Speer, and Charles Watkinson.

Recognizing that library publishing services represent one part of a complex ecology of scholarly communication, Purdue University Libraries, in collaboration with the Libraries of Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Utah, secured an IMLS National Leadership Grant under the title “Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success.” The project, conducted between October 2010 and September 2011, seeks to advance the professionalism of library-based publishing by identifying successful library publishing strategies and services, highlighting best practices, and recommending priorities for building capacity.

The project has four components: 1) a survey of librarians designed to provide an overview of current practice for library publishing programs (led by consultant October Ivins); 2) a report presenting best practice case studies of the publishing programs at the partner institutions (written by consultant Raym Crow); 3) a series of workshops held at each participating institution to present and discuss the findings of the survey and case studies; and 4) a review of the existing literature on library publishing services. The results of these research threads are pulled together in this project white paper.

Click on the contents tab to see the various sections of the report.

Generation Y doctoral students and collaboration

JISC recently released this report.

Researchers of Tomorrow: The research behaviour of Generation Y doctoral students

Researchers of Tomorrow is the UK’s largest study to date on the research behaviour of Generation Y doctoral students (born between 1982 and 1994). JISC and the British Library jointly commissioned the three year study in 2009, which involved 17,000 doctoral students from 70 universities at various stages in the project.

Our research findings reveal:

  • Doctoral students are increasingly reliant on secondary research resources (eg journal articles, books), moving away from primary materials (eg primary archival material and large datasets).
  • Access to relevant resources is a major constraint for doctoral students’ progress. Authentication access and licence limitations to subscription-based resources, such as e-journals, are particularly problematic.
  • Open access and copyright appear to be a source of confusion for Generation Y doctoral students, rather than encouraging innovation and collaborative research. [emphasis added.]
  • This generation of doctoral students operate in an environment where their research behaviour does not use the full potential of innovative technology.
  • Doctoral students are insufficiently trained or informed to be able to fully embrace the latest opportunities in the digital information environment.

These findings raise important questions about research development, training and support within research led organisations and the openness and sharing of research.

Futures thinking and collaboration in academic libraries

This 33 page report just came out.  Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians: Higher Education in 2025. (PDF document.)

Prepared by Dr. David J. Staley, Director of the Harvey Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching in the History Department of Ohio State University and Kara J. Malenfant, ACRL Scholarly Communications and Government Relations Specialist

Collaboration is mentioned and talked about in several sections.  For example, this was on page 17:

“The democratizing and crowdsourcing of research would be a very good thing for our society and would challenge libraries to play a role in making research available to all and creating tools that aid in collaborative research.”

They also have a podcast concerning the report.  Thanks to Stacey for the note.