Category Archives: software

Editorial board that spans 16 time zones–much collaboration needed

This paper was presented at the recent IFLA meeting in Singapore.

The ALTO editorial board: collaboration and cooperation across borders

From some of the abstract:

The current editorial board has members from the National Library of Finland, the British Library, Singapore National Library Board, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Netherlands Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Library of Congress, the University of Kentucky, the University of California Riverside, and a software company, Content Conversion Specialists. All but two are IFLA members, and several serve on other standards boards in addition to the ALTO board. (You can see the list of current editorial board members at http://www.loc.gov/standards/alto/community/editorialboard.html.) With members in cities that span 16 time zones, you can imagine collaboration, cooperation, and good communication are essential to achieving anything. Of course a willingness of the members in the outlying time zones to get up early or stay up late is indispensable too. Good telecommunications infrastructure is imperative, and, as we will see, free and easy (Skype) sometimes is not reliable. This paper gives an account of the history of the ALTO XML standard, of the ALTO editorial board, and of the ways that the board organizes itself and conducts its business.

Collaboration with chat services like LibraryH3lp

This blogpost came out in April, but it is still very relevant.

Building grassroots collaboratives with LibraryH3lp

Dr. S. R. Ranganathan proposed in 1931 that the library is a growing organism. And librarians are a collaborative bunch, frequently corresponding with colleagues and building shared collections and services. With hundreds of libraries using LibraryH3lp every day, there is a fantastic opportunity for collaboration and leveraging cross-institutional expertise to grow your virtual reference service.

Because LibraryH3lp was initially created to serve an after-hours cooperative chat and IM service for students at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Duke University, and North Carolina State University, the capability to collaborate has been built into LibraryH3lp from the very beginning. And because one of our core values is flexibility, collaboration comes in many flavors.

The rest of the articles describes methods to use their software to collaborate with others.

LibraryH3lp chat service can be use collaboratively between institutions

Building grassroots collaboratives with LibraryH3lp

Because LibraryH3lp was initially created to serve an after-hours cooperative chat and IM service for students at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Duke University, and North Carolina State University, the capability to collaborate has been built into LibraryH3lp from the very beginning. And because one of our core values is flexibility, collaboration comes in many flavors.

All options below are available even though you and your partnering institution maintain completely separate LibraryH3lp subscriptions. In this way, you can leverage your existing partnerships — or forge new partnerships — to extend your virtual reference service wherever possible while maintaining your own local service.

Read on…

MIT and Harvard collaborate on an online education service

MIT and Harvard announce edX. This is “a transformational new partnership in online education. Through edX, the two institutions will collaborate to enhance campus-based teaching and learning and build a global community of online learners.”

Hypothes.is | Platform for the collaborative evaluation of information

The blurb on the Hypothes.is website says:

It will enable sentence-level critique of written words combined with a sophisticated yet easy-to-use model of community peer-review. It will work as an overlay on top of any stable content, including news, blogs, scientific articles, books, terms of service, ballot initiatives, legislation and regulations, software code and more-without requiring participation of the underlying site.

It is based on a new draft standard for annotating digital documents currently being developed by the Open Annotation Collaboration, a consortium that includes the Internet Archive, NISO (National Information Standards Organization), O’Reilly Books, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and a number of academic institutions.

They noted a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for a workshop on February 22-24 in San Francisco and a Fellows program, so they must be on to something.

Coliibri collaboration software

http://www.coliibri.com

Coliibri is build from 100% community-sourced content, allowing authors to rally around creating unique works in a fun, collaborative atmosphere. Coliibri removes many of the traditional boundaries that limit innovation. You can collaborate on any idea with virtually anyone in the world.

Video for more info: https://www.coliibri.com/projects/coliibri-tutorial-video-v2

New collaboration tool developed at Rutgers University

Rutgers LIS Prof. receives a Yahoo! Award which supports the development of an online collaboration tool. This project seeks to understand the motivations and methods that collaborative workers employ while seeking information.

Chirag Shah, assistant professor of Library and Information Science at SC&I, has been awarded a Yahoo! Campus Innovation Award of $20,000 to further develop “Coagmento,” an online tool that promises to enhance collaboration by focusing on not only the results of shared work, but also the processes.