Category Archives: Higher Education

NITLE to focus on collaboration and liberal arts colleges

From Inside Higher Ed – Cultivating Collaboration

The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, in an effort to broaden its scope and address the challenges facing liberal arts colleges, will this fall launch a do-it-yourself toolkit for institutions that want to work together.

The organization, also known as NITLE, aims to use the Collaboration Consulting Program to expand its role as a consultant for liberal arts colleges.

Hipstas Project Aims to Make Sound Recordings More Accessible

The Hipstas (High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship) Project from the University of Texas Austin in collaboration with the Illinois Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign uses an algorithm to visualize and classify sound.

This tool was originally used to identify bird calls, and is now being used to analyze archival sound recordings and make them more usable. Check out The Chronicle of Higher Education article for more information.

ARL needs a SHARE Technical Project Manager

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is looking for someone to manage an 18-month project to build the SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) Notification Service. SHARE is a collaborative initiative between the ARL, the Association of American Universities, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.  This PDF has more information about the open position.

Collaboration through the Long Night

In the current issue of College & Research Libraries News, New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) details their implementation of a program called “Long Night Against Procrastination”. This program was modeled after a successful German event of the same name.

The NYUAD Library partnered with their Writing Center to provide writing & research consultations, refreshments and activities during extended hours. NYUAD reports on their successes and lessons from this event.

Academic librarians should participate in departmental faculty candidate interviews

This is a great article in the new C&RL News.

The first sparks of collaboration: Participating in job interviews for faculty candidates” by Brett Spencer.

As shown by many inspiring articles in C&RL News over the past few years, academic librarians are energetically seeking ways to spark collaborations with teaching faculty and build partnerships that enrich the learning experiences of our students. Librarians often have their first opportunity to meet a new faculty member when the prospective professor comes to campus for an interview. Perhaps you’re a liaison to an academic department, and the department brings faculty candidates over to the library so that you can give them a quick tour and highlight the array of information resources they could access if they accepted positions on your campus. I think these library visits are great opportunities to kindle relationships with new faculty. This article offers some questions to consider when preparing for faculty interviews, based on tips and advice that I’ve received from outstanding teaching faculty and seasoned library colleagues over the years.

Occam’s Reader Project

Library Journal reports on a new collaboration between several universities, the Greater Western Library Alliance, and Springer. This collaboration will focus on the use of a new software called Occam’s Reader used for processing interlibrary loan of e-books.

This is the first major collaboration of its kind between academic libraries and a major publisher.

AAUP Recommendations for Successful Press-Library Collaborations

The Library Relations Committee of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) has released the results of extensive surveying and interviews with member institutions of both AAUP and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), conducted in 2012-2013.

AAUP’s conclusions and recommendations for successful collaboration between presses and libraries can be found on their website, along with a full length report.

New Location in the Alexandria Co-Working Network

An Arizona State University initiative called the Alexandria Co-Working Network aims to bring people together in collaboration spaces in public libraries across Arizona. The grand opening of their newest space in the Phoenix Public Library’s Burton Barr Central Library will take place on Friday, January 17th.

This initiative is led by ASU’s Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group, and was launched with the goal of creating a statewide network of places for people to connect, collaborate and find valuable resources.

Visit Digital Journal for more information on this collaboration.

Notes and Slides from recent CARL meeting on Collaboration

Library Journal has posted the slides and meeting notes from the December 2nd, 2013 meeting of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL). The objective of the meeting was to discuss a proposal for a Canadian network of research data management services.

Two good examples of library collaboration

Here are two new items today.

The Internet Reviews was published in a recent C&RL News; it noted the Digital Library of the Caribbean.

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a collaborative international digitization project involving 18 partner institutions from around the Caribbean region. Culling collections from academic libraries, private collections, and archives, dLOC documents the diverse historical and cultural legacies of the many islands and surrounding areas of the Caribbean.

Community Collaboration: Phoenix Public Library Joining Arizona St. University’s Alexandria Co-Working Network.”  Found via the InfoDocket.

The Alexandria Co-Working Network is an ASU initiative that brings people together in collaboration spaces in public libraries across Arizona. The new space at Burton Barr Central Library will support the entrepreneurs, inventors, problem-solvers and small-business owners across the Valley who need help to advance their ideas but don’t currently have access to the necessary tools.