Category Archives: article

Canadian Public Libraries in British Columbia collaborate for service excellence

This article was just published in the BCLA Browser: Linking the Library Landscape, Vol 6, No 1 (2014)

BC public libraries take a collaborative step forward in support of service excellence” by Barbara Kelly and June Stockdale

June Stockdale, Chief Librarian at the Nelson Public Library and Barbara Kelly, Project Manager on behalf of the BC Libraries Cooperative for the Digital Learning Objects Repository, invite everyone to be part of the growing conversation about a new service that will make the sharing of program and training ideas, templates, outlines, and scripts easy and effective.

Academic librarians should participate in departmental faculty candidate interviews

This is a great article in the new C&RL News.

The first sparks of collaboration: Participating in job interviews for faculty candidates” by Brett Spencer.

As shown by many inspiring articles in C&RL News over the past few years, academic librarians are energetically seeking ways to spark collaborations with teaching faculty and build partnerships that enrich the learning experiences of our students. Librarians often have their first opportunity to meet a new faculty member when the prospective professor comes to campus for an interview. Perhaps you’re a liaison to an academic department, and the department brings faculty candidates over to the library so that you can give them a quick tour and highlight the array of information resources they could access if they accepted positions on your campus. I think these library visits are great opportunities to kindle relationships with new faculty. This article offers some questions to consider when preparing for faculty interviews, based on tips and advice that I’ve received from outstanding teaching faculty and seasoned library colleagues over the years.

Two good examples of library collaboration

Here are two new items today.

The Internet Reviews was published in a recent C&RL News; it noted the Digital Library of the Caribbean.

The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a collaborative international digitization project involving 18 partner institutions from around the Caribbean region. Culling collections from academic libraries, private collections, and archives, dLOC documents the diverse historical and cultural legacies of the many islands and surrounding areas of the Caribbean.

Community Collaboration: Phoenix Public Library Joining Arizona St. University’s Alexandria Co-Working Network.”  Found via the InfoDocket.

The Alexandria Co-Working Network is an ASU initiative that brings people together in collaboration spaces in public libraries across Arizona. The new space at Burton Barr Central Library will support the entrepreneurs, inventors, problem-solvers and small-business owners across the Valley who need help to advance their ideas but don’t currently have access to the necessary tools.

School library programs need collaboration

Cynthia Strong from Seattle Pacific University submitted an article –  “Importance of School Library Programs.”

This is a pre-print version of the article to be published in 2014.

Within the discipline of library science, over 20 research studies have been done in the United States attesting to how quality school library programs contribute to improved academic achievement. On the other hand, in the fields of education, school counseling, administration, and school leadership, and so on, there is a dearth of scholarship and recognition of the positive impact librarians and library media program have on student success. This conceptual paper first presents an overview of the empirical research on school library programs and the positive impact they have on the academic achievement of students in the United States. Second, the argument is made that if education is to remain sustainable, it is essential that collaborative relationships are developed between school librarians and other personnel within school buildings.

Hackers code and collaborate in the library

Here is another article. This one is from the journal, Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research.

The Steacie Library Dungeon Hackfest: Hackers in the Library Coding, Collaborating and Creating by Sarah Shujah

From some of the abstract:

The Steacie Science and Engineering Library at York University hosted its first annual Steacie Library Dungeon Hackfest in February 2013. The purpose of a hackfest is to spend a day (or longer) using computer programming skills to collaborate on a particular software project and, hopefully, bring the project to reality. The project may be an app, widget, or website. It is evident that hackfests, as a form of engaged learning, help to reinforce the relevance of the library since it has implications for information literacy, open access, faculty liaison, and the changing perception of library as place. Twenty-five participants that included students, faculty, and staff hacked on Open York Data: York University’s openly accessible records and data such as course codes, lab stats of computers available in various libraries, subject headings, and research interests of faculty.

Collaborative publications, bibliometrics, and veterinary medical research

This early view article came out about six months ago in preparation for College & Research Libraries. I am not sure how I missed it.

Exploring the Veterinary Literature: A Bibliometric Methodology for Identifying Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Publications,” by Jessica R. Page, Heather K. Moberly, Gregory K. Youngen, and Barbara J. Hamel

Veterinary medical research traditionally focuses on animal health and wellness; however, research activities at veterinary colleges extend beyond these traditional areas. In this study, we analyzed eleven years of Web of Knowledge-indexed peer-reviewed articles from researchers at the twenty-eight United States American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary colleges.

We had three goals in assessing the published literature of veterinary college researchers. First, we identified a list of journals and research areas outside of veterinary medicine in which veterinary researchers publish. This list of journals can be customized to identify those most essential at each institution. Second, we identified collaborative work by veterinary researchers across disciplines and institutions. Using textual analysis tools and visualizations helped us illustrate and clarify this data. Lastly, we developed a methodology for defining an interdisciplinary serials list outside a subject core that can be customized for specific institutions and subject areas.

I found a cite to this through Gregory K. Youngen’s presentation at a recent Association of Interdisciplinary Studies conference.

Repurposing library software to enhance collaboration

This looks like a great new article from Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice.  It reports an interesting use of the IMDb website.  I didn’t know that one could export IMDb information.

Open Source Opens Doors: Repurposing Library Software to Facilitate Faculty Research and Collaboration” by Sandra L. Stump and Rosemary L. Deegan

Abstract

Asked to convert a faculty-created Microsoft Word document of biblical references found within popular films into a searchable database for scholars, the Albright College library staff helped create a multi-access database called Bible in the Reel World. The database relied on student workers for inputting data, used MARC standard formatting for future portability, and encouraged interactive feedback, enabling scholars to submit comments and suggest additional films and references. Using the open source integrated library system Koha, MarcEdit software, and free record exporting from IMDb, library staff created a fully-searchable database for researchers and scholars to examine the use of scripture in popular film.